VOCALISM - Songs of the People 2016 Showcase Event
Dec
10
8:00 pm20:00

VOCALISM - Songs of the People 2016 Showcase Event

  • Crescent Arts Centre

£3 Pay at the door

Doors open at 7.30pm



VOCALISM and the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission bring together those who have participated in their workshops and they will draw upon their skills and creativity in order to perform together, giving everyone the chance to express their culture and identity.



Citizenfour
Dec
10
4:00 pm16:00

Citizenfour

  • Lanyon Building, Room 0G/074

Free



Room 0G/074, Lanyon Building, QUB

"We are building the biggest weapon for oppression in the history of mankind." Ed Snowden

After Laura Poitras received encrypted emails from someone with information on the government's massive covert-surveillance programs, she and reporter Glenn Greenwald flew to Hong Kong to meet the sender, who turned out to be Edward Snowden.

The Belfast Group of Amnesty International will host the screening of Citizenfour to support Amnesty International’s campaign to ask Barack Obama to pardon Edward Snowden before the end of his mandate: https://www.amnesty.org.uk/actions/president-obama-pardon-edward-snowden-surveillance-whistleblower 



NICRAS Women's Group - Life in Northern Ireland
Dec
10
2:00 pm14:00

NICRAS Women's Group - Life in Northern Ireland

  • Chinese Welfare Association

Free



NICRAS is a Refugee Community Organisation (RCO) which was established in 2002. It is the only refugee led organisation in Northern Ireland that represents the interests of the refugee community.
NICRAS aims to support the integration process of refugees and asylum seekers into local communities throughout Northern Ireland; raise awareness of the issues, problems and difficulties faced by refugees and asylum seekers in Northern Ireland; inform members of relevant changes to immigration policy and legislation; organise social and recreational events; and, respond to the changing needs of its members.

NICRAS welcome you to join us in a roundtable discussion with refugee and asylum-seeking women who will discuss the experiences, problems, and impressions of Northern Ireland since arriving. NICRAS is currently working on a project with refugee and asylum-seeking women. The project aims to assist them in learning about rights, gaining skills, finding their voice in the local community, and knowledge of life in Northern Ireland. 

To find out more about or organisation, check out our video -https://www.facebook.com/100009752526423/videos/341143749554040/ 

And our website - http://www.nicras.btck.co.uk/ 


Activism Works: Winning in the fight to the right to water
Dec
10
2:00 pm14:00

Activism Works: Winning in the fight to the right to water

  • Golden Thread Gallery

Free



In this event we will be revisiting some of the Right to Water campaigns, hearing from activists representing communities who are defending their land and their water from environmental destruction and degradation, both at home and abroad. From Woodburn to Greencastle to Cajamarca, Peru, water is a universal human right.


Mighty Girls
Dec
10
1:00 pm13:00

Mighty Girls

  • Dark Horse

Free



Named after the popular social media movement, this is an opportunity for adults and young people to hear an hour of storytelling about some of the smartest, confident and most courageous girls from around the world. Looking for new heroines for your kids? You can find them right here.


Breast Feeding & Human Rights
Dec
10
12:00 pm12:00

Breast Feeding & Human Rights

  • Black Box, Green Room

Free


 Photo: ALAMY

 Photo: ALAMY


Join us for a talk by Rebecca Schiller, from the charity Birthrights on the links between breastfeeding, childbirth and human rights.

Followed by a panel discussion on the Northern Ireland context with:

Breedagh Hughes - Royal College of Midwives

Janet Calvert - Public Health Agency

Claire Hanna - SDLP MLA



Gender Stereotypes: We've got a job to do
Dec
10
11:00 am11:00

Gender Stereotypes: We've got a job to do

  • Dark Horse

Free


© [Kurhan] / Fotolia

© [Kurhan] / Fotolia


Many jobs are still unfortunately laced with preconceived gender stereotypes about being either a man or woman's role.

This event, which starts with an artistic workshop will turn those preceonceptions on their head and introduce young people to men and women who work in amazing roles and refuse to conform.


NIHRF Family Day
Dec
10
10:00 am10:00

NIHRF Family Day

  • Black Box/Dark Horse/Hill Street

Free


Join us throughout the day for a host of activities aimed at families in the centre of Belfast. In addition to the events highlighted elsewhere, we will have street magic, music and crafts.

Bring the kids for what is always one of the highlights of the week.


Write for Rights
Dec
10
10:00 am10:00

Write for Rights

  • Black Box, Green Room

Free



Join the Belfast Amnesty group for their annual Write for Rights Campaign.

This family-friendly event gives you the opportunity to learn about individuals currently at risk around the world and to send a greeting card to them to show your support and acknowledge that you are aware of their case.



Stand Up For Your Rights Charity Fundraiser
Dec
9
8:00 pm20:00
9th

Stand Up For Your Rights Charity Fundraiser

  • Belfast Barge

Tickets

£10

BYOB



Can human rights be funny?

With just three short weeks of stand-up training 8 brave human rights workers will dare to entertain and inform you with comic tales from frontline rights activism.

All proceeds go to sustaining the NI Human Rights Festival.

Bring a bottle! And some rotten fruit!


Detention Without Walls
Dec
9
7:00 pm19:00
9th

Detention Without Walls

  • Conway Mill

Free



The difficulties experienced inside immigration detention do not end with release and there are new and unexpected obstacles. These include disorientation, poor accommodation and the continued separation from family and friends.

  • People are still at risk of deportation and experience difficulties associated with uncertainty. The threat of deportation meant that people “couldn’t make no plans”, as they were always “up and down with paperwork . . . waiting, waiting, waiting”.

The uncertainty of life after detention is indefinite, just as immigration detention is currently indefinite. Living with this uncertainty means that many people in these circumstances experience stress, anxiety and sleeplessness.

This is a follow on event from “Detaining human rights” held by ‘STAR’ and ‘Larne House Visitor Group’ on Wednesday December 7th in the Student Union. With the aid of a short film “Detention without walls” we will discuss the issues faced by people leaving detention and the impact this has on their daily life. We have as a guest Shirley Gillian from ‘Scottish Detainee Visitors’ who was involved in setting up the ‘Life After Detention’ project. Using focus groups, interviews, mapping, photography and film-making, the participant researchers explored the experience of life after detention and a number of key findings emerged from their work as expressed in the opening three paragraphs above.

With our event we aim to highlight these hidden problems and also show how individuals can help and support people caught up in these traps of the immigration system. Many groups already actively campaign on these and other related issues. We will explain how you can be a part changing an immigration system that isn’t treating people as human beings in need of help, support and understanding.


The Great British Break Off
Dec
9
1:00 pm13:00
9th

The Great British Break Off

  • Black Box, Green Room

Free



What will be the impact of Brexit in Northern Ireland?

How might negative aspects be stopped or reduced?

This event will examine what the Northern Ireland options are for ensuring that if Brexit does proceed, that core human rights and peace process safeguards are protected.


Training to Help Identify Forced Labour: A Workshop
Dec
9
10:00 am10:00
9th

Training to Help Identify Forced Labour: A Workshop

  • Law Centre NI

Free

Registration Required: RSVP margaret.reid@lawcentreni.org


ECHR Article 4 prohibits slavery and forced labour. But what is forced labour?  Does it really happen in N. Ireland? Is it the same as human trafficking? Who are the victims and what happens to them? Is there anything we can do to help? 

With support from Belfast City Council, the Law Centre has created a training resource that can be used by community organisations to inform their members about forced labour and exploitation.   

This training resource will equip the attendee with all the information they need to deliver the training in their own setting/community/group. 

The training resource includes a range of different materials. Ultimately, it is designed to give people the tools to recognise the signs of forced labour and exploitation and to know how to get help. 

Increased awareness is an essential component of the fight against forced labour. Join our interactive workshop, meet our specialist employment advisers and be inspired to use our training resource wherever you can!


From a Republic of Conscience
Dec
8
8:00 pm20:00
8th

From a Republic of Conscience

  • Belfast Barge

Free

BYOB



Curated and led by poet Chelley McLear, this events lets loose a gathering of talented local poets whose social commentary has inspired them. An homage to the poems and poets who reflect the Republic Heaney so beautifully described.



Belfast Friendship Club: ECHR Article 11 Night
Dec
8
7:00 pm19:00
8th

Belfast Friendship Club: ECHR Article 11 Night

  • Common Grounds Cafe

Free



Belfast Friendship Club: ‘a diverse bunch of people with a lot in common’
In 2009, BFC began welcoming newcomers to the city and into the safe and neutral setting of a café where they could freely meet others including those born or otherwise settled here. It now routinely attracts 30-60 people each week from 15+ nationalities, a wide age range and many walks of life. 

Including the 5-10 newcomers each week, members arrive via friends, classmates, relatives, colleagues, housemates or having been ‘signposted’ from elsewhere. 

‘Belfast Friendship Club – a huge gift to Belfast’
Duncan Morrow, University of Ulster, 2013

On arrival, all are greeted at the door and given a simple, hand written name badge. The information recorded is simply their first name, their country of origin and whether this is a first visit to the club. Newcomers are then invited to circulate freely, perhaps having been introduced to someone to ease the process. As noted in our evaluation ‘what is striking about the club is that ‘nothing happens’, except a round of announcements at the end of the evening, yet it is an intensely social occasion’ (Wilson, 2012).

With very rare exceptions, no activities are laid on and nothing else is organised during the
two hour weekly meetings which have become the ‘heartbeat’ that drives all else within the club. Those gathered can use the space however they wish and this generates a sense of connection arising from the apparent ‘unity in diversity’ that transcends the usual barriers operating to separate people from one another. 

In the seven years since it began, BFC has grown beyond all expectation, welcoming 3500+ people to its weekly meetings, events and other activities. With core values of equality, respect and solidarity, BFC has developed characteristics of a social movement and, to date, has given rise to a great many spin-offs including language exchanges, creative projects and catering initiatives, as well as attempts to replicate its model and of which there are currently five in operation across the island of Ireland. 

“I want to say thanks to the people who envisaged it could be possible and the ones who have actually made it a reality”
BFC member

‘Be the change: a guide to creating safe and inclusive space’ is a booklet based upon the experience of BFC. It was published in 2014 and is available as a PDF download from our website:

www.belfastfriendshipclub.org
@BelongInBelfast
Stephanie.mitchell@sbrtr.org.uk
+44 (0)7548 938508


Cartooning for Rights
Dec
8
Dec 9
8th

Cartooning for Rights

  • Moot Court, School of Law, QUB

Free



Indian freedom of expression activist and cartoonist Aseem Trivedi has been imprisoned, threated, and harassed for his cartoons denouncing corruption and censorship in India. The leading human rights campaigner with join Front Line Defenders and Queen's University Belfast to talk about art, censorship, activism, and human rights in India and beyond.

Aseem Trivedi played a leading role in India's 2010 anti-corruption movement with his "Cartoons Against Corruption" series, for which the government suspended Aseem's website and charged him with sedition, breaching the IT act, and "insulting" national symbols. After spending three days in prison, Aseem launched the Save Your Voice campaign against the IT rules being used to target him and other activists, and went on hunger-strike demanding they be repealed. In 2015, following years of peaceful activism, India's Supreme Court struck down the IT rules Aseem was once imprisoned under. Later that year, he created a comic magazine dedicated to telling the stories of human rights defenders at risk around the world. Today, while the sedition and IT charges have been dropped, Aseem still faces up to three years in prison for "insulting" the government through his art. 

Front Line Defenders is an Irish organisation providing rapid and practical support to human rights defenders at risk. Founded in Dublin in 2001, Front Line Defenders conducts advocacy, security trainings, emergency grants and campaigning on behalf of at-risk human rights defenders around the world.

The Human Rights Centre at QUB aims to support human rights in the local and global community. Founded in 1990, we aim to support academic and human rights organisations in the promotion of human rights.






'A Window on the Occupation'
Dec
8
7:00 pm19:00
8th

'A Window on the Occupation'

  • Duncairn Centre for Culture & Arts

Free



‘A Window On The Occupation’ will provide an insight into the occupation of the West Bank by Israel through the personal accounts of Dr. Brendan Browne and Danielle Carragher.

Dr Brendan Browne is an Assistant Professor in Conflict Resolution at Trinity College (in Belfast), Fellow at the Centre for Post-Conflict Justice, and former Assistant Professor in Human Rights and International law at Al Quds (Bard) University Palestine. His work focuses on the experience of children and young people growing up in Palestine.

Danielle Carragher holds an MSc in International Conflict and Cooperation and works in the field of peace empowerment through the arts with a specific focus on children and young people. She has just returned from the West Bank where she facilitated music workshops in a Palestinian Peace Education Centre. 

‘A Window On The Occupation’ will include a photo exhibition entitled ‘visualising conflict’ and, as well as presentations, will include time for an open discussion on the personal experiences of Danielle Carragher and Dr. Brendan Browne in Palestine.


Prayer Walk for Human Rights
Dec
8
6:30 pm18:30
8th

Prayer Walk for Human Rights

  • Starting at: St Annes Cathedral

Free



The modern human rights agenda owes much to its Christian heritage. This event will give participants an opportunity to walk through the city praying at various points for the institutions that strive to promote and protect human rights such as the courts and the Human Rights Commission. The walk will culminate at a venue with the opportunity to reflect on how Christianity birthed the modern notion of human rights. 


I, Daniel Blake (15)
Dec
8
6:20 pm18:20
8th

I, Daniel Blake (15)

  • QFT

I, Daniel Blake (1h 40m) is not an easy watch – but it is an important one. This is a film that everyone must see.

For fifty years Ken Loach has made brave, challenging and, at times, derided films. Beginning with Cathy Come Home in 1966 he has consistently shone a light on social issues; homelessness, inequality, injustice and poverty. Now, at 80, he has made what might be his final film, I, Daniel Blake, and what a film it is. 

On one level the story of an everyman battling a Kafkaesque bureaucracy, Loach’s film is an excoriating critique of the English benefits system and a culture which paints those in need as ‘shirkers’. 

A carpenter by trade, with a lifetime of work behind him, widower Daniel (Dave Johns) suffers a heart attack. Judged unfit for work by his doctor, when he tries to get the benefits he is due he comes up against the full box-ticking might of the Department for Work and Pensions and so his nightmare begins. 

With this simple, dignified film, Ken Loach has created a tragedy for our times - the real tragedy of course is that, fifty years after he began making films, we still need his honesty, compassion and anger. 

Powerful, honest and at times unbearably moving, I, Daniel Blake is not an easy watch – but it is an important one. This is a film that everyone must see.





All I Want For Christmas Is Equality
Dec
8
6:00 pm18:00
8th

All I Want For Christmas Is Equality

  • Cornmarket

Free



Love Equality will have a huge Christmas card on display for the public to sign.

You will also have the chance to record video messages about why marriage equality is important to them.

This event will be supported by drag performers, so come on down and join in!

This free event aims to highlight the growing public support for marriage equality.


Language Rights in Local Government: A Framework for Implementation
Dec
8
2:00 pm14:00
8th

Language Rights in Local Government: A Framework for Implementation

  • The Factory, The MAC

Free



Conradh na Gaeilge will host a lecture demonstrating why language rights are human rights and need to be considered as part of the wider discussion on human rights.  Local and international examples show how minority language communities are best served when language issues are regarded within a rights based framework.  The absence of legislative protection for the Irish language community here not only breaches international obligations but also has a signifcant practical impact on Irish language communities at a local level.

Consecutive reports from the International Convention on Social, Economic and Cultural Rights and from the European Charter for the Protection of Regional and Minority Languages’ Committee of Experts have highlighted the lack of protection for the Irish language community as something which infringes rights found in international treaties and needs to be addressed by the Assembly at the earliest opportunity.

This discussion will discuss the rights framework which currently exists in relation to the Irish language and how and why legislative protection is necessary to ensure that international obligations are implemented at a local level.  This can be done through using international examples of best practice and applying them to the local context.

Time will be available for questions and discussion at the end of the lecture.  


Helped or Harassed: The Human Rights Act and the Armed Forces
Dec
8
1:00 pm13:00
8th

Helped or Harassed: The Human Rights Act and the Armed Forces

  • Black Box, Green Room

Free



The UK Government has indicated its intention to derogate from the European Convention on Human Rights for future armed conflicts so it can protect Armed Forces personnel.

What would the impact of derogation be and is it even legal?

Join us for a range of perspectives on this important topic.


Human Rights in Northern Ireland: Past and Future
Dec
8
11:00 am11:00
8th

Human Rights in Northern Ireland: Past and Future

  • The Works, The MAC

Free



Human Rights in Northern Ireland: Past and Future: A seminar about the issues facing human rights activists in Northern Ireland in the past and in the future. 

Maggie Beirne, a past Director of the Committee on the Administration of Justice (CAJ) will present her short history of CAJ, “A Beacon of Hope.” Brian Gormally, the current Director of CAJ, will speak on the challenges facing human rights defenders in the era of Brexit and resurgent racism, the struggle to overcome the legacy of the past and the prospects for the future. A panel of distinguished human rights lawyers and activists will discuss the issues raised with the audience.

In the preface to her history of CAJ, Maggie Beirne notes that:

Mary Robinson, then UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, visited Belfast a few months after the negotiation of the Belfast/Good Friday Agreement in 1998, and said of the Committee on the Administration of Justice: “CAJ has been a beacon of light in Northern Ireland’s long hard night”. People coming new to the organisation may want to know why she said this, and long-standing members may enjoy being reminded of their role in making this assessment possible.

Maggie’s monograph sets out the history of the organisation that led to Mary Robinson’s conclusion and its work since. 

For the past five years, Brian Gormally has been Director of CAJ and will take this opportunity to outline the contemporary challenges facing CAJ and the human rights community in general. He will argue that significant threats to the protection of human rights in Northern Ireland and to the basis of the peace settlement have arisen in the last two years. The current UK Government is committed to repeal of the Human Rights Act (HRA) and we have also seen the referendum campaign demanding that the UK leave the European Union which was characterised by xenophobia and unashamed racism.

Brian will say that in taking its work forward over the next three years, CAJ will take as its priorities combating impunity, working for contemporary accountability, protecting the freedom of expression and assembly while suppressing racism, protecting human rights and the peace settlement, promoting equality and international solidarity.



Human Rights Commission's Annual Statement
Dec
8
10:30 am10:30
8th

Human Rights Commission's Annual Statement

  • Long Gallery, Parliament Buildings

Free

Registration is required. RSVP by !st December to events@nihrc.org



Review of Human Rights Legislation in Northern Ireland in 2016.

Professor Joesph Cannatci, UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Privacy will deliver the keynote speech at the Human Rights Commission's flagship event.

Please RSVP your attendance by 1st December to events@nihrc.org



Tory Gillespie: Baby Madness is a Real Disease + Support
Dec
7
8:00 pm20:00
7th

Tory Gillespie: Baby Madness is a Real Disease + Support

  • Belfast Barge

Tickets

£7  (Also available on the door)

BYOB



Tory Gillespie is always trying to right society's wrongs through the medium of comedy.

After her sell-out show 'Ulster Loves Me', she returns with 'Baby Madness is a Real Disease', a comprehensive look at fertility, family, and the radical idea that a women's uterus is her own business!

Plus support.



Detaining Human Rights
Dec
7
6:30 pm18:30
7th

Detaining Human Rights

  • Queens Students Union

Free



Each year over 30,000 people, including children, are locked up in prison like conditions without a time limit, lack of judicial oversight, inadequate access to legal advice & poor healthcare. Their crime: being migrants or asylum seekers. The UK government spends £37,000 a year, per head and last year alone 15 million pounds was paid out in compensation to those detained unlawfully. Who is benefitting from this?

The detention estate has become a lucrative business for private companies such as G4S, Serco, Mitie, and GEO, who profit from the imprisonment of these people. Detention centre are rarely discussed in the media or on the street, with the Home Office, ignoring its own guidelines, consistently detaining pregnant women, children, or survivors of torture.

The issue is closer to home than many may think with Larne’s short holding facility a short distance away. This event will expose detention; its effects and its failures. But it will also give you the opportunity to be part of the movement that wants change. Thousands of people will continue to be detained unless we take action. 


Michael Mansfield - A Radical Lawyer
Dec
7
Dec 8
7th

Michael Mansfield - A Radical Lawyer

  • Duncairn Centre for Culture & Arts


A keynote address by the eminent British Barrister Michael Mansfield QC followed by an intimate Q&A session facilitated by BBC journalist William Crawley.

Michael Mansfield is perhaps the definitive example of British Human Rights Lawyer. He has dedicated his life to challenging injustice and serious breaches of human rights at home and abroad. Having being involved in notable landmark human rights cases representing clients such as the Guildford Four, Birmingham Six, Bloody Sunday families, the Hillsborough Disaster families, the family of Stephen Lawrence, Jean Charles de Menzes and many others.

In this talk he will share his experience of challenging human rights abuses and injustice across a legal career that has spanned over forty years and has mirrored some of the most challenging periods of recent British and Irish History, from the troubles in Northern Ireland to more recent counter terrorism across the UK. Looking forward Michael will also share his thoughts on the challenges that remain for dealing with the past and the unfinished legacy investigations of the troubles in Northern Ireland as well as his views on wider UK legal debates such as current threats to the Human Rights Act and the challenges that the Brexit process may present for the defence of human rights. 


Silence of Suicide: Networking Initiative
Dec
7
3:00 pm15:00
7th

Silence of Suicide: Networking Initiative

  • Duncairn Centre for Culture & Arts

Free

Register your place using the link below:

https://getinvited.to/humanrightsconsortium/silence-of-suicide-networking-initiative/



Silence of Suicide, along with Suicide Awareness and Support Group invite you to their networking initiative.

Join Michael Mansfield QC and Yvette Greenway, along with those from Belfast's Suicide Awareness and Support Group at this free event.

However you've been touched by suicide, whether you want to speak or listen, this is a fantastic platform for you to say how you feel, tell your story, and hopefully create a new network of support for yourself.

It gives those affected by suicide in any way the chance to contribute in any way they feel comfortable, without fear of judgement.

Everyone is encouraged to speak, whilst listening to others.

http://www.sossilenceofsuicide.org/


Polarising the Polls: What polling can tell us about attitudes to abortion
Dec
7
2:30 pm14:30
7th

Polarising the Polls: What polling can tell us about attitudes to abortion

  • Black Box, Green Room

Free



 A one hour session hosted by Amnesty International on the changing political opinions of the Assembly and the public in relation to abortion reform, giving an in-depth insight into Amnesty’s 2016 polling on the subject.

It will include addressing trends in attitudes to abortion, specifically respondents with political affiliations.

Followed by a Q&A with the audience.


The Role of the Ombudsman's Office - Achievement and Challenges
Dec
7
12:30 pm12:30
7th

The Role of the Ombudsman's Office - Achievement and Challenges

  • Ulster University, Room BA-03-019 Board Room

Free



Room: BA-03-019 Board Room

The Office of the Police Ombudsman in Northern Ireland has been in operation for over 15 years and has been described as the "gold standard" of police accountability. 

In 2011 the Office was the subject of a series of critical reports questioning its independence from the police. 

It will examine the on-going challenges of delivering a robust police complaints system in Northern Ireland including funding, accessing information and the difficulties of dealing with the past.