Irish Innocence Project - One Day Workshop

  • Moot Court Room, School of Law, QUB 27 - 30 University Square Belfast, BT7

Free

Registration Required - You can register here.



Making a Murder doesn't just happen in Wisconsin.

QUB Human Rights Centre, in conjunction with the Irish Innocence Project at Griffith College bring you a one day workshop where participants will investigate the case of Harry Gleeson, who was wrongfully convicted of murder and hanged in 1941.

The last thing I want to say is that I will pray tomorrow that whoever did it will be discovered, and that the whole thing will be like an open book. I rely on you then to clear my name. I have no confession to make, only that I didn’t do it. That is all. I will pray for you and be with you if I can, whenever you [Mr. Sean MacBride], Mr. Nolan-Whelan and Mr. Timoney are fighting and battling for justice.

The last words of Harry Gleeson, on the eve of his hanging, to his lawyer

Sean MacBride, Tuesday 22 April 1941

 

The Case Study of Harry Gleeson

Harry Gleeson was arrested days after the 20-21 November 1940 murder of Mary “Moll” McCarthy in New Inn, Tipperary and within five months, was convicted and hanged to death on 23 April 1941.

He always claimed he was an innocent man.

Due to the persistence of the Irish Innocence Project at Griffith College and the Justice for Harry Gleeson group, on 13 January 2016, nearly 75 years after his execution, three surviving relatives of Harry Gleeson received a signed posthumous presidential pardon – the first ever given in Irish history – recognizing Harry’s innocence.

Now your students can investigate Harry Gleeson’s case and get a firsthand experience of what it’s like to be an Irish Innocence Project at Griffith College caseworker.

Among the skills they will practice, students will:

 Read case files

  • Analyse evidence
  • Identify weaknesses in the case
  • Explore new leads
  • Work in small groups
  • Establish a timeline
  • Write case character profiles
  • Create a case report
  • Present their findings to their peers

 They will also learn about wrongful convictions, their most common causes, the role of the Irish Innocence Project at Griffith College in this worldwide human rights and social justice issue .